Crabapple Bonsai Trees ~ (Malus) Crabapple trees are highly sought after bonsai material for their spring (often fragrant) flowers, beautiful fall color and long lasting bright mini apples. The crabapple varieties below are all suitable for bonsai trees. There is a variety of colors to choose from and some are quite hardy. Click the photos below to learn more about each Crabapple species, purchase the complete bonsai or a pre-bonsai and start creating your own masterpiece specimen bonsai tree!

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BONSAI TREE CRABAPPLE

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PRE-BONSAI RADIANT
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PRE-BONSAI ZUMIE
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PRE-BONSAI ROYALTY
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PRE-BONSAI SARGENTII
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PRE-BONSAI SUTYZAM

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Crabapple Bonsai Trees ~ "Malus" or Crabapple trees, are highly sought after and prized bonsai material for their spring (often fragrant) flowers and long lasting, colorful mini apples. On some varieties the apples will even last throughout the winter.

Although Crabapples are relatively easy to care for and are quite hardy, they are susceptible to powdery mildew, some hybrid varieties are more tolerant than others. Treating a tree during it's dormancy for powdery mildew will keep it from over-wintering in the joints and buds and showing up on it's summer leaves. Use a treatment recomended by a local garden center in your area.

Crabapples are "deciduous" meaning they will loose their leaves in the winter. They must be kept outside and be exposed to a cold climate where they will enter into "dormancy" which is a time of rest when the tree quits growing and rests. Some Crabapples will live all the way down to Plant USDA Hardiness Zone 3, though it's recommended you protect the roots from extreme freezing with a cold frame or garden mulch to prevent winter die back when they are in a bonsai pot.

Crabapples thrive in a basic bonsai soil mix kept moist but not soggy.

Position them in full sun with some shade during extreme heat.

Large pruning cuts should be done in the late winter just before they come out of dormancy. Keep your bonsai dense and compact by snipping or pinching back shoots to two leaves in the spring and into late summer.

Fertilize starting in the spring, once the tree is in full bloom stop fertilizing until the fruits are developed and then resume. Fertilizing during fruit production can cause profuse leaf growth and less fruits.

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LOCATION: Full Sun, Shade from extreme heat.

WATERING: Water sparingly during winter, when buds begin to swell keep constantly moist but not soggy wet. Pay extra attention to keep wet while in fruit to avoid apples withering.

TRAINING: Prune after flowers are spent and in the fall. Keep your bonsai dense and compact by snipping or pinching back shoots to two leaves in the spring and into late summer.

STYLES:Any size, Smaller leaf and fruit varieties for smaller sizes. Informal upright, slanting, semi-cascade,twin trunk, & clump.

POTTING: Pot in late winter or early spring before buds break. Re-pot annually.

FERTILIZING: Weekly until flowering during the growing season. For maximum fruit crop, stop fertilizing while fruit develops and resume when it's mature.

USDA HARDINESS ZONE: 3 Protect roots from freeze in bonsai pot.

ASSETS: Flowers, some cultivars have extremely fragrant blossoms. Long lasting fruit, vibrant fall color, deciduous, displays twiggy branch structure during winter.  

WATCH FOR: Powdery mildew, afids, apple rust.

ACQUIRING: Grafting, Layering in spring or early summer, Stratified seeds can be planted in the spring, otherwise plant seeds in the fall. Crab-apples depending on the variety can take many years to produce fruit.